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“You talk white.” one of my fellow classmates said in disgust, prompting others around to snicker and giggle. I was in the 2nd grade, it was just after lunch and we hand made it to the concrete covered field our elementary school dared to call a play yard.

I had never in my 8 short years only planet earth given much thought to how I spoke, until that day.

Honestly, I was always commended on my speech from church leaders, my teachers, most of all from my own parents who were the guiding reason I spoke the way I did, all of whom were Black people. …


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Chrissy Teigan shared a few moments of grief on her Instagram. She recently suffered the loss of her unborn son, who she and her husband, singer John Legend, had been calling Jack.

She chose to share that loss on her Instagram. Her post opened up a flood of responses; words of kindness, words of condolences, words of empathy. Natural feelings human beings express when they see or feel others in sorrow.

Unfortunately, her post also opened her up to criticism.

Jason Whitlock, former football player, and current commentator, took to Twitter to make commentary on Chrissy’s expression of grief, tweeting the…


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Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

No one expected 2020 to turn out the way it has. To say that so many of us have felt the sting of disappointment, the anguish of fear, and the struggle with out own mental health issues is an understatement. In a time where all of our usual coping mechanisms; a good hug, going out with friends, having a drink or two at a bar, have been deemed dangerous, many of us have been left with nothing but the pain of the issue.

So many are struggling with the seemingly endless loneliness because of COVID-19, or anxiety because you’ve lost your job, or feeling completely overwhelmed by the unstoppable stream of negative news and injustice, (especially if you’re Black) or the deep grief because of the loss or illness of a loved one, or, for reasons unknown to you, you simply can’t figure why you don’t feeling like yourself. …


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If we thought that Rachel Dolezal was an enigma, we were all corrected by today’s revelation courtesy of Jessica Krug.

Jessica Krug, a white professor who teaches “politics, ideas, and cultural practices in Africa and the African Diaspora” at George Washington University, outed herself on Medium, outed herself after pretending to be a Black Woman for the entirety of her professional career.

She starts, saying “To an escalating degree over my adult life, I have eschewed my lived experience as a white Jewish child in suburban Kansas City under various assumed identities within a Blackness that I had no right to claim: first North African Blackness, then US rooted Blackness, then Caribbean rooted Bronx Blackness.” …


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Recently, CBS shared a poll, dubbed the Battleground Tracker, conducted to survey attitudes about various concerns in the United States.

As CBS notes about the following information:

“The CBS News national survey was conducted by YouGov using a nationally representative sample of 2,226 U.S. registered voters interviewed between August 19–21, 2020. The margin of error is ± 2.4 points. The CBS News national post-convention survey was conducted by YouGov using a nationally representative sample of 957 U.S. registered voters re-interviewed after the conclusion of the Democratic National Convention, between August 20–22, 2020, and who had been interviewed in CBS News polls prior to the convention. The margin of error is ± 3.6 …


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One of my friends recently confessed to me her new favorite thing, watching “Karen” videos. I was instantly confused. She then texted me several links, to which I gasped and had to Retweet. It featured a woman in Dallas, Texas, who, after she was asked to put on her mask to check out of the grocery store, rather than simply place it on her face, instead emptied her cart by throwing the various items on the floor.

You can see why I gasped.

This is a reminder that we are STILL in the middle of a global pandemic. COVID-19 has taken the lives of over 100,000 people and affected millions of us here in the United States. Data has shown the numerous benefits of social distancing, washing our hands with soap and water for 20 seconds, and wearing masks. These actions have been proven to protect lives, not only our own, but others as well. …


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In case you’ve missed it, the world is experiencing a massive shift. The social movement Black Lives Matter is enveloping the globe with massive demonstrations in all 50 U.S. States and in 20 countries across the globe. As a result, racism and particularly anti-Blackness is being rooted out and exposed in every facet of life.

Businesses, brands, and organizations are being called to the mat to answer for the past ways they have dealt (or not dealt) with racism within their own walls. …


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Support for the Black Lives Matter movement seems to be pouring from anywhere we can look. Whether a tweet from a celebrity or a black and white post from a brand or business, social media is riddled with millions of well meaning social posts standing in solidarity.

But is it authentic or just for show? Many have started to wonder about these social posts and the folks they come from, and just how real the support actually is. It only takes a casual observer to note which organizations and personalities mean well and which mean business. …


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The Daily Beast

By now, we have all heard about Amy Cooper, the White woman going viral after calling the police on Christian Cooper, no relation, a Black man after he asked her to put her dog on a leash in The Ramble, a nature preserve in New York City.

Rather than leash her dog, Amy instead chooses to argue with Christian, escalating to what happens next in the viral video, which shows Amy calling the police. She threatens Christian, saying “I’m going to tell them there’s an African-American man threatening my life.”

Amy knew what she was doing, and it can be seen in her choice of words: I am going to call the police and tell them, as a White woman, that you a Black man, are threatening my life. She made a fake 911 call on a false accusation of a Black Man attacking her. …


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It’s hard out here for woke girls.

The constant stream of police brutality, blatant racism, injustice, climate change, and overall bad news from around the nation and globe is enough to make you numb as protection from all of the heartbreaks they render. One day, you catch a White Woman weaponizing her tears against a Black Man, another day you catch an actual video of another Black person’s life snuffed out by police brutality.

It’s painful. It’s ongoing. It’s unrelenting.

As “woke” women, we surround ourselves with information, we are the first to volunteer, the first to extend ourselves, to engage in dialogue. We vote. We go to the neighborhood cleanups. …

About

Whitney Alese

Whitney Alese is a writer, podcaster and cultural commentator. Featured in WIRED Magazine (September 2020). She is based in Philadelphia.

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