This Is America just got White Washed by one of the worst people imaginable

Whitney Alese
5 min readMay 14, 2018

It finally happened. This Is America, the video/ song starring Donald Glover that is causing so much buzz and creating dialogue around guns and violence towards the African American community, has been appropriated. And it couldn’t have been appropriated by a more problematic woman.

Nicole Arbour, a relic of Youtube whose career virtually ended when she created a ‘satire’ video where she all but terrorizes an over-weight family just trying to enjoy their vacation somewhere, because God forbid anyone be out here having a good time with the opinions of the privileged.

Nicole is nothing but a scam queen, thriving off Youtube views of her cyber bullying with titles such as ‘depression is all in your head’, ‘why you really got divorced’ by people who most likely don’t like her. Her other videos also include rants such as ‘Dear Black People’ and ‘Dear Refugees’, ones I can almost guarantee lean towards the MAGA hate group than into an actual dialogue.

She is nothing more than a pretty blonde troll making nasty comments on the internet that would rather direct her comedy at harming others than actually making people laugh or think. In fact, that is the reason why I have only included a still of the video and not the video itself. Plus, co-opted crap does not get re-shared. There will be no additional views of this blatantly disrespectful piece coming from this site.

If you want to (hate) watch, feel free to look her up on Youtube, but don’t say I didn’t warn you.

I guess that is why her lated foray into attempting to create something positive completely bombed. Her latest video, This is America, Women’s Edit, seeks to shadow the Childish Gambino video, This Is America, and probably take some of its shine as well. The Women’s Edit also takes place in a warehouse, but that is pretty much where the similarities end. Instead of a poignant video brutally raising the discussion of gun violence and the African American experience, Nicole drenches the experience in vanilla blandness, completely draining the message of the original for her own benefit, also known as appropriation. Nicole literally has attempted to appropriate the visual struggle. Nicole dances around with other women throughout the video, trying…

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Whitney Alese

Whitney Alese is an award winning writer & creator featured in WIRED Magazine, I-D Magazine, NBC, & Chalkboard Magazine.